U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

economy

economy

Dan ByersStephen Eule

Virtually unheard of just 3 months ago, the Green New Deal (GND) has burst into the national debate faster and more furiously than any issue in recent memory.

Dan Byers

Earlier this month, the Chamber’s Global Energy Institute rolled out our “American Energy: Cleaner, Stronger” agenda.

Stephen Eule

In late December, the White House released its new National Security Strategy that describes U.S. interests and how the Trump Administration plans to advance them in the coming years.

Stephen Eule

My colleague Dan Byers summarized some of the really big stuff in President Trump’s sweeping

Stephen Eule

Over the last couple of years, we’ve taken some deep dives into the U.S.

Christopher Guith

Europe has so many historical and cultural wonders that even the reddest of red-blooded Americans can find something European to be envious of.  After all, it was Europeans who gave us Led Zeppelin, pizza, and beer and personally, I think it’s high time we consider adopting the siesta as a nation

Christopher Guith

Sitting here in late September 2016, it’s pretty difficult to imagine what the U.S.

Christopher Guith

It’s an interesting question. That we’re even entertaining it, however, shows you how far off the rails candidates from Secretary Clinton, to interest groups, to the Democratic Party Platform have gone in proposing to ban energy production on federal lands in one way, shape, or form.

Stephen Eule

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) head Gina McCarthy appeared before the House Science Committee on Wednesday, June 22, and the EPA’s Clean Power Plan (CPP) was front and center in the minds of many committee members.

Heath Knakmuhs

Today we are back with one of our most popular features – an annual update to our retail electricity price map.  These prices best reflect what business, industry, and you must pay for a given unit – or kilowatt hour – of electricity.  Last year’s edition found electricity prices climbing in all but a single state.  This year, however, our analysis shows a mixed-bag of increases and decreases among the fifty states and the District of Columbia.